Derek J. Smith

CEng (Information Systems), CITP, FHEA, MBCS, Dip Med Ed (Dundee)

 

Consultant Cognitive Scientist

Page first released 18:00 GMT 12th January 2010. This version [1.5 - update] dated 09:00 BST 11th July 2014.
 

 

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CEO and Chief Designer, High Tower Consultants Limited

 

Research Associate, International Software Products, Toronto

 

Previously Senior Lecturer in Informatics and Cognitive Science at University of Wales Institute, Cardiff

 

 

AT A GLANCE

Between 1980 and 1991 I worked for the Cardiff data processing division of British Telecom, specialising in the design and operation of very large databases and management support systems. Between 1991 and 2010 I lectured in health informatics and cognitive science at University of Wales Institute, Cardiff (UWIC), specialising in the cognitive neuropsychology required by Speech and Language Therapists. I am currently Chief Designer on the Konrad artificial consciousness project.

 

CONTACT ME AT smithsrisca@btinternet.com

PROJECT KONRAD

Konrad is a state-of-the-art simulation of biological cognition which combines my database design experience and in-depth understanding of cognition with International Software Products' CA-IDMS production platform. By focusing on the semantic network nature of the mind's long-, medium-, and short-term memory systems the Konrad software offers clients and collaborators a test-bed, complete with detailed print-out, on which they can explore hypotheses as to mental function which cannot be tested in living subjects. Project Konrad is animated cognition taken to the extreme. It is designed around the best models available from philosophy, neuropsychology, and psycholinguistics, and runs at about natural speed. Its USP [= Unique Selling Proposition] is that it gives you a microscopically detailed hard copy at the end of each run telling you how it did what it did.

 

GO TO PROJECT KONRAD HOMEPAGE

PROJECT ANEURIN

 

Aneurin is a work-in-progress online encyclopaedia on the theme of humankind at war, inspired by the rapidly approaching centenary of the Great War. Each essay takes an issue of philosophical interest [what is bravery, say, and can it be taught], and then seeks explanatory insight in the cognitive science literature. Time and time again the available theory implicates our species' primate inheritance as a self-indulgent and intolerant man-ape, capable, when properly primed, of unrestricted cruelty and destruction. The relationship between our animal emotions and our much-vaunted faculties of intellect is especially interesting, with the former prevailing over the latter far too often for us to sleep easily in our beds. Details aside, the individual essays, each in its own way, reflect upon a common central issue, namely that we really do need to understand why the War to End All Wars achieved nothing of the sort, indeed has been followed without break by a hundred years of accelerating human conflict. WW1, in short, is a lesson still waiting to be learned, and it would be a fitting tribute to the millions who suffered at its hands to use its centenary years for this very purpose.

 

GO TO PROJECT ANEURIN  HOMEPAGE

STUDENT RESOURCES

In my 20 years as university lecturer I produced a large number of explanatory handouts and encyclopaedic resources. Most of these began as hard copy material in the 1990s, but were subsequently upgraded for electronic delivery under the Smithsrisca banner between 2000 and 2005. These are indexed below, along with some more recent conference PowerPoint presentations .....

Artificial Intelligence / Machine Consciousness Series

Short-Term Memory Subtypes in Computing and Artificial Intelligence: Part 1 - A Brief History of Computing Technology, to 1924

click here

Short-Term Memory Subtypes in Computing and Artificial Intelligence: Part 2 - A Brief History of Computing Technology, 1925 to 1942

click here

Short-Term Memory Subtypes in Computing and Artificial Intelligence: Part 3 - A Brief History of Computing Technology, 1943 to 1950

click here

Short-Term Memory Subtypes in Computing and Artificial Intelligence: Part 4 - A Brief History of Computing Technology, 1951 to 1958

click here

Short-Term Memory Subtypes in Computing and Artificial Intelligence: Part 5 - A Brief History of Computing Technology, 1959 to date

click here

Short-Term Memory Subtypes in Computing and Artificial Intelligence: Part 6 - Memory Subtypes in Computing

click here

Database Navigation and the IDMS Semantic Net

click here

Short-Term Memory Subtypes in Computing and Artificial Intelligence: Part 7 - Memory Subtypes in Cognitive Science

UNDER CONSTRUCTION - draft and key points available on request from the author

A Computer Simulation of Meinong's (1902) Objektiv Stage of Object Perception [CONFERENCE POWERPOINT, Edinburgh, April 2009]

click here

A Demonstration of Philosopher-Friendly Reductionism in a Computational Model of Cognition [CONFERENCE POWERPOINT, Oxford, September 2009]

click here [this file will need unzipping before use]

The Forensic Ergonomics of Distraction Errors: A Computer Simulation [CONFERENCE POWERPOINT, Keele, April 2010]

click here [this file will need unzipping before use]

The Surprisingly Difficult Science of Beautiful Paintings [EXHIBITION POWERPOINT, Wrexham Science Festival, July 2012]

click here

Artificial Consciousness: A CA IDMSTM Database Solution to Autonomous Robotics [CONFERENCE POWERPOINT, CA World '13, Las Vegas, April 2013]

browse to conference website for copy

The Cognitive Science of Aesthetic Interaction [CONFERENCE POWERPOINT, BCE EVA 2013, London, July 2013]

abstract; email for PowerPoint

The Surprisingly Difficult Science of Two plus Two [CONFERENCE POWERPOINT, BCME8, Nottingham, April 2014]

email for copy **NEW***

Trench Gothic: The Computer Visualisation of a Disturbing Great War Artwork [CONFERENCE POWERPOINT, BCS EVA 2014, London, July 2014]

click here **HOT OFF THE PRESS***

Our Mental Philosophy Glossary

Here are the files making up my multi-file navigable data dictionary on the theme of self and consciousness .....

Mental Philosophy Glossary [Introduction and Index]

click here

Mental Philosophy Glossary [A/B]

click here

Mental Philosophy Glossary [Case Histories]

click here

Mental Philosophy Glossary [Consciousness]

click here

Mental Philosophy Glossary [C, remaining entries]

click here

Mental Philosophy Glossary [D]

click here

Mental Philosophy Glossary [E/F]

click here

Mental Philosophy Glossary [G/H/I]

click here

Mental Philosophy Glossary [J/K/L]

click here

Mental Philosophy Glossary [M/N/O]

click here

Mental Philosophy Glossary [Persona.....]

click here

Mental Philosophy Glossary [P/Q/R]

click here

Mental Philosophy Glossary [S]

click here

Mental Philosophy Glossary [T to Z]

click here

Brain and Behaviour Series

Cross-Sectional Anatomy of the Cerebrum

click here

Microanatomy of the Cerebral Cortex

click here

Communication and the Naked Ape

click here

The Motor Hierarchy

click here

Motor Programming

click here

Biological Cybernetics

click here

Hebbian Theory

click here

The Limbic System, Motivation, and Drive

click here

The Pyramidal and Extra-Pyramidal Motor Systems

click here

From Frontal Lobe Syndrome to Dysexecutive Syndrome

click here

Robotics, Cybernetics, and the Like

An Introduction to Connectionism

click here

A Brief History of Automata

click here

Basics of Cybernetics

click here

The Eckert-von Neumann Machine

click here

Introduction to Systems Theory

click here

Shannonian Communication Theory and Biological Communication

click here [regret Figure 2 temporarily unavailable]

An Introduction to Data Modelling for Semantic Network Designers

click here

On database keys, with an application to the Praxisproblem. [CONFERENCE POWERPOINT, Orlando, FL, July 2005]

click here

The problem of context in sentence production - Surely a case to re-convene the Data Base Task Group? [CONFERENCE POWERPOINT, Austin, TX, July 2005]

click here

How ideas evolve into speech - A computer animation. [CONFERENCE POWERPOINT, Oxford, September 2005]

click here

An Interdisciplinary Validation of the Ego Defence of Splitting [CONFERENCE POSTER, Swansea, April 2007]

e-mail the author

Freud as Real-Time Programmer [LECTURE POWERPOINT, Cardiff, 2008; Aberystwyth, 2008]

e-mail the author

Historical Cognitive Models Series (In Timeline Sequence)

I am a keen cognitive modeller, and included practical modeling skills at a number of points in my psychology curriculum. My own six-module modular diagram of cognition (Smith, 1993b; Smith and Stringer, 1997; Smith, 1999c; Smith, 2000b; Smith, 2010c) attempts (a) to locate, and (b) to show the relationship between, the major types of long-, medium-, and short term memory in a three-level biological control hierarchy. The following items trace how the story starts .....

Descartes (1662) - The Philosopher's View

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Bell-Magendie (1811) - The Anatomist's View

click here

Wernicke (1874) - The Aphasiologist's View

click here

Kussmaul (1878) - Early "Cog Neuro" View

click here

Charcot's (1883) "Bell" - Early "Cog Neuro" View

click here

Lichtheim's (1885) "House"

click here

Grashey (1885)

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James (1890)

click here

Freud (1891)

click here

Wundt (1902)

click here

Freud (1896) - The Psychoanalyst's View

click here

Freud (1900) - The Psychoanalyst's View

click here

Control Hierarchy Models Series (In Timeline Sequence)

.....and the following items bring us fully up to date .....

Freud (1923) - The Psychoanalyst's View

click here

Freud (1933) - The Psychoanalyst's View

click here

Craik (1945) - The Pioneer Ergonomist's View

click here

Wepman et al (1960) - The Clinician's View

click here

Frank (1963) - The Information Scientist's View

click here

Reader (1969) - Early Roboticist's View

click here

Dennett (1978) - The Philosopher's View

click here

Rasmussen (1983) - The Forensic Ergonomist's View

click here

Allport (1985) - The Distributed Semantics View

click here

Norman (1990) - The State-of-the-Art View

click here

Arkin (1990) - State-of-the-Art Roboticist's View

click here [scroll to Figure 7]

Smith (1993) - The System Analyst's View

click here

Frith, Rees, and Friston's (1998) - "Forward Model" [LECTURE POWERPOINT]

click here

Smith (2007-2011) - Project Konrad's View [which incorporates all the above]

click here for latest [e-mail the author for earlier versions]

Theoretical Cognitive Science

Aesthetics Timeline **NEW**

click here

Education Theory Timeline

click here

Experiential Learning: The Knowledge Structures and the Cognitive Processes

click here

How to Draw Cognitive Diagrams (with tutorial exercises)

click here

Transcoding Models - Introduction and Overview

click here

Norman and Bobrow's (1975) Resource Allocation Theory

click here

Speech Errors, Speech Production Models, and Speech Pathology

click here

Dyslexia and the Cognitive Science of Reading and Writing

click here

Neuropsychology/Aphasiology Timeline

click here

Neuropsychology/Aphasiology Glossary

click here

Memory Glossary

click here

Psycholinguistics Glossary

click here

Rational Argument Glossary

click here

Supervenience Glossary

click here

History of Human Writing Systems Glossary

click here

An Introduction to Creativity

click here

The Bilingual Brain (Why Machines Can't Translate for Toffee) [EXHIBITION POWERPOINT Wrexham Science Festival, 10th March 2008]

click here

The Psychology of Numeracy

click here

Mathematics in the Mind [EXHIBITION POWERPOINT Wrexham Science Festival, 30th March 2009]

click here

The Molyneux Question

click here

The human operator revisited: Autonomous machines as equals (or not quite) in the control room of the future [CONFERENCE POWERPOINT, Paris, October 2010]

click here [this file will need unzipping before use]

Modern Psycholinguistic Models Series (In Timeline Sequence)

Morton (1964)

click here

Gough (1972)

click here

Marshall and Newcombe (1973)

click here

Morton (1979)

click here

Morton (1981)

click here

Ellis (1982)

click here

Roeltgen and Heilman (1985)

click here

Crosson (1985)

click here

Ellis and Young (1988)

click here

Kay, Lesser, and Coltheart (1992)

click here

Coltheart, Curtis, Atkins, and Haller (1993)

click here

Perception, Attention, and Memory Models (In Timeline Sequence)

I lectured in cognitive neuropsychology between 1991 and 2010, and covered all aspects of memory theory, including the amnesias and the underlying biochemistry. From a theoretical standpoint, I favour the Lashley-Pribram distributed memory approach (having been impressed with Karl Pribram's holographic hypothesis ever since it first appeared back in the 1960s). I also closely follow research into "second messenger" neurotransmission, because I hold the mechanisms of medium-term neural sensitisation to be fundamental to the emergence of all complex cognitive faculties, including abstraction, association, self-awareness, and consciousness.

Cherry (1953)

click here

Broadbent (1958)

click here

Sperling (1960)

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Sperling (1963)

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Sperling (1967)

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Pribram's Holonomic Theory of Memory (1969)

click here

Atkinson and Shiffrin (1971)

click here

Baddeley (2000)

click here

Human Error Series

Basic Laws of Life and Complex Systems

click here

IT Project Management Disasters

click here

Systems Thinking: The Knowledge Structures and the Cognitive Processes

click here

Mode Error in System Control

click here

Situational Awareness in Effective Command and Control

click here

Military Bungling (including the battles of New Orleans and Isandhlwana Hill, the Charge of the Light Brigade, Custer's Last Stand, and the tragic story of USS Vincennes vs Iran Air Flight 655, 1988)

click here

Transportation Disasters - Aerospace (including the Staines disaster, 1972, and the Kegworth disaster, 1989)

click here

Transportation Disasters - Maritime (including the Titanic and Exxon Valdez disasters)

click here

Transportation Disasters - Rail

click here

The human operator revisited: Autonomous machines as equals (or not quite) in the control room of the future [CONFERENCE POWERPOINT, Paris, October 2010]

click here [this file will need unzipping before use]

PREVIOUSLY

Professional Activities

For 20 years I maintained my professionalism as a computer person by active involvement with the South Wales Branch of the British Computer Society. I served on the branch committee from 1992 to 2011, and was Chairman 1996-1998. I also served 1998-2006 as psychology advisor to the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists. I hold the Certificate in Training Practice from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development and a postgraduate diploma in medical education from the Centre for Medical Education, University of Dundee.

My Animated Cognitive Models Projects

The PowerPoints listed above regularly use animated diagrams, but that facility has only been reliably available since 2005. For six years before that I used commercial cartooning software to produce a number of short cameo animations of cognitive models. In 2002, for example, I animated an engineer's analysis of the principles of mental data transmission and presented this on 9th April 2002 as a poster-plus-CD-ROM at the "Tucson V - Towards a Science of Consciousness" conference. The project before that was to produce a computer animation of the rapid changes in system state which take place during a short act of human facial recognition. This animation was presented on 30th June 2000 as a poster-in-motion at the ASSC4 Conference in Brussels, Belgium. The project before that was an animation of the critical role played by information feedback during the process of human speech production. This was presented on 10th April 2000 as a poster-in-motion at the "Tucson 2000 - Towards a Science of Consciousness" conference. And the project before that (Oct-Nov 1999) was an animation of Alan Baddeley's Working Memory Model of Memory. The development work was carried out on resources kindly provided by British Telecom, Cardiff, and the resulting animation "went live" during a cognitive science lecture to UWIC students on 18th November 1999.  [Sadly not all these early animations still work due to changes in the Windows CODEC drivers in the intervening years, and they have largely been replaced by PowerPoint re-writes.]

LIST OF PUBLICATIONS

CONFERENCES AND JOURNAL ARTICLES

Smith, D.J. (1990). The entity, the attribute, and the relationship. Paper presented September 1990 to the British Psychological Society Cognitive Section Annual Conference, Leicester. [This was my first attempt to bring industrial data modelling techniques to bear on the problems of cognitive theory.]

Smith, D.J. (1991). Suppositions of belonging: The computational principles of meaning. Paper presented September 1991 to the British Psychological Society Cognitive Section Annual Conference, Oxford.

Smith, D.J. (1992). The psychology of effective college governance: Part 1 - the management skills. Journal of Further and Higher Education, 16:87-99.

Smith, D.J. (1993a). FETC and the latecomer to teaching. Journal of the National Association for Staff Development, 28:17-22.

Smith, D.J. (1993b). The psychology of effective college governance: Part 2 - the cognitive skills. Journal of Further and Higher Education, 17:77-85.

Smith, D.J. (1995a). Professional Development through Post-Graduate Research Supervision. Journal of the National Staff Development Agency, 32:24-33.

Smith, D.J. (1996a). Effective teaching: A quick measure. [Unpublished research report, submitted as postgraduate coursework to University of Dundee.] [Requests for reprints to the author.]

Smith, D.J. (1997a). The magical name Miller, plus or minus the umlaut. In Harris, D. (Ed.), Proceedings of the First International Conference on Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics (Volume 2). Aldershot: Ashgate. [ISBN: 0291398472] [Being the transcript of a paper presented 24th October 1996 to the First International Conference on Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics, Stratford-upon-Avon.]

Smith, D.J. (1997b). The IDMS set currency and biological memory. Poster presented 10th March 1997 at the Interdisciplinary Workshop on Robotics, Biology, and Psychology, Department of Artificial Intelligence, University of Edinburgh.

ASIDE: I was particularly fortunate during my years with British Telecom to work on the design, development, and support of a very large CODASYL database system. The platform used was ICL's IDMS(X), a UK-licensed variant of Computer Associates' CA-IDMS system. This type of database organises its contents into an intricate network, rather than into the tabular columns and rows used by more simplistic systems, and in order to manage the resulting data networks the system software relies upon a number of clever internal tricks. When I took up cognitive science in 1991, I decided to look for the biological equivalents of these mechanisms (after all, the mind had so often been described as a biological database, that it seemed reasonable to enquire after its database internals). I eventually concluded that the most compelling similarity was between the IDMS concept of "database currency" and the biological mechanisms of second messenger neurotransmission. Both allow their respective systems to maintain a particular mental theme across a timespan larger than the span of the immediate here and now, both do this by holding material momentarily somewhere between short term memory and long term memory, both combine storage and retrieval functions, and - above all - both exist to help "bind" widely scattered memory fragments into logical wholes. What CODASYL databases give us, therefore, is a tangible paradigm for biological consciousness in general, and a working example of a system architecture which has successfully overcome the "binding problem" in particular. For the precise argument and parallel worked examples see Smith (1997a) and Smith (1997e), for the paradigm's utility in addressing the explanatory gap see Smith (1998c), for the front runners in mapping the human knowledge network see Doug Lenat's CYC Project, and for an introduction to the binding problem consult Valerie Gray Hardcastle's Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness website.

Smith, D.J. (1997c). Chunking and cognitive efficiency: Some lessons from the history of military signalling. Paper presented 27th March 1997 to the 11th Annual Conference of the History and Philosophy of Psychology Section of the British Psychological Society, York.

Smith, D.J. (1997d). Book Review: "How Brains Think: Evolving Intelligence, Then and Now", by William H. Calvin, 1996. Journal of Consciousness Studies, 4:381-382.

Smith, D.J. (1998a). Feedback in speech production. Invited paper presented 10th April 1998 at the Centre for Neuroscience, University of Florida Health Science Centre, Gainesville, FL.

Smith, D.J. (1998b). Book Review: "Anthropology at the Edge", by J. Ian Prattis, 1996. Journal of Consciousness Studies, 5:255.

Smith, D.J. (1998c). Commentary on "Cortical Activity and the Explanatory Gap" by J.G. Taylor. Consciousness and Cognition, 7:214-215.

Smith D.J. (1999a). Freudian structures in the computational mind: Some lessons from the study of ritual sacrifice. Cardiff: UWIC. Paper presented 15th April 1999 to the 13th Annual Conference of the History and Philosophy of Psychology Section of the British Psychological Society, York.

Smith, D.J. (1999b). Borderline Dyslexia in Higher Education. [Unpublished research report, submitted as postgraduate coursework to University of Dundee.] [Requests for reprints to the author.]

Smith, D.J. (2000a). A slow-motion video analysis of information feedback in a computer-animated psycholinguistic model. Computer-animated poster presented 10th April 2000 at the Tucson 2000 - Towards a Science of Consciousness conference, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

Smith, D.J. (2000b). A slow-motion video analysis of the arrival and circulation of initially unbinded input within consciousness. Computer-animated poster presented 30th June 2000 at the Fourth Annual Meeting of the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness, Free University, Brussels, Belgium.

Smith, D.J. (2000c). Book Review: "Artificial Life: An Overview", by Christopher G. Langton (Ed.), 1995. Journal of Consciousness Studies, 7(6):89-91.

Smith, D.J. (2002). Intramodular neurotransmission and the Wichita Lineman. Poster presented 9th April 2002 at the Tucson 2002 - Towards a Science of Consciousness conference, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

Smith, D.J. (2002). Book Review: "Painting, Psychoanalysis, and Spirituality", by Stephen J. Newton, 2001. Journal of Consciousness Studies, 9(3):83-87.

Smith, D.J. (2005). On database keys, with an application to the Praxisproblem. In Callaos, N., Lesso, W., and Palesi, M. (Eds.), The 9th World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics, and Informatics, July 10-13, 2005 - Orlando, Florida, USA (Volume IV). Orlando, FL: International Institute of Informatics and Systemics. [Play PowerPoint]

Smith, D.J. (2005). The problem of context in sentence production - Surely a case to re-convene the Data Base Task Group? In Chu, H.-W., Savoie, M.J., Sanchez, B., and Hong, S.-M. (Eds.), The 3rd International Conference on Computing, Communications, and Control Technologies, July 24-27, 2005 - Austin, Texas, USA (Volume III). Orlando, FL: International Institute of Informatics and Systemics. [Play PowerPoint]

Smith, D.J. (2005). How ideas evolve into speech - A computer animation. Paper presented at the 9th Conference of the Consciousness and Experiential Psychology Section of the British Psychology Society, St. Anne's College, Oxford, 16th-18th September 2005. [Play PowerPoint]

Smith, D.J. (2009a). A computer simulation of Meinong's (1902) Objektiv stage of object perception. Paper presented 8th April 2009 to the Annual Conference of the History and Philosophy of Psychology Section of the British Psychological Society, University of Edinburgh. [Play PowerPoint]

Smith, D.J. (2009b). A computer simulation of Meinong's (1902) Objektiv stage of object perception. History and Philosophy of Psychology, 11(1): 37-43.

Smith, D.J. (2009c). A demonstration of philosopher-friendly reductionism in a computational model of cognition. Paper presented 11th September 2009 to the 12th Annual Conference of the Consciousness and Experiential Psychology Section of the British Psychological Society, St. Anne's College, Oxford. [Play PowerPoint]

Smith, D.J. (2010a). The forensic ergonomics of distraction errors: A computer simulation. Paper presented 14th April 2010 to the Annual Conference of the Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors, University of Keele. [Play PowerPoint]

Smith, D.J. (2010b). The human operator revisited: Autonomous machines as equals (or not quite) in the control room of the future. Paper presented 25th October 2010 to the International Control Room Design Conference, Eurosites République, Paris. [Play PowerPoint]

Smith, D.J. (2010c). The human operator revisited: Autonomous machines as equals (or not quite) in the control room of the future. In Wood, J. (Ed.),  Conference Proceedings, ICOCO 2010. Leicester: Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors.

Smith, D.J. (2012a). The surprisingly difficult science of beautiful paintings. Paper presented 26th July 2012 at the Wrexham Science Festival. [Play PowerPoint]

Smith, D.J. (2012b). Embodied versus disembodied representation in an act of artificial cognition. Guest Lecture online - Shanghai Lectures 2012.

TEACHING MATERIAL ISSUED UNDER ISBN ....

Smith, D.J. (1995b). Systems Engineering for Healthcare Professionals. Cardiff: UWIC. [ISBN: 1900666022 - out of print]

Smith, D.J. (1996b). Memory, Amnesia, and Modern Cognitive Theory. Cardiff: UWIC. [ISBN: 1900666006]

Smith, D.J. (1996c). Brain and Communication. Cardiff: UWIC. [ISBN: 1900666014]

Smith, D.J. (1997e). The IDMS Set Currency and Biological Memory. Cardiff: UWIC. [ISBN: 1900666057] [Workbook to support poster presented 10th March 1997 at the Interdisciplinary Workshop on Robotics, Biology, and Psychology, Department of Artificial Intelligence, University of Edinburgh.]

Smith, D.J. (1997f). Chunking and Cognitive Efficiency: Some Lessons from the History of Military Signalling. Cardiff: UWIC. [ISBN: 1900666065] [Transcript of paper presented 27th March 1997 to the 11th Annual Conference of the History and Philosophy of Psychology Section of the British Psychological Society, York.]

Smith, D.J. (1997g). Human Information Processing. Cardiff: UWIC. [ISBN: 1900666081]

Smith, D.J. (1997h). Neuroanatomy for Students of Communication. Cardiff: UWIC. [ISBN: 190066609X - out of print]

Smith, D.J. and Stringer, C.B. (1997). Functional Periodicity in Biological Information Processing Architectures. Cardiff: UWIC. [ISBN: 1900666073]

Smith, D.J. (1998d). Applied Cognitive Psychology. Cardiff: UWIC. [ISBN: 1900666103]

Smith D.J. (1999c). Freudian Structures in the Computational Mind: Some Lessons from the Study of Ritual Sacrifice. Cardiff: UWIC. [ISBN: 1900666111] [Transcript of paper presented 15th April 1999 to the 13th Annual Conference of the History and Philosophy of Psychology Section of the British Psychological Society, York.]